The World of Joe Tex

Singer, dancer, writer, preacher, rapper, comic and all around original...

The legacy

Income from Joe Tex copyrights is divided between his last wife Bilaliah, their child Ramadan, and Joseph (Hazziez), Jwaade,  Eartha and Joseph 3rd born from previous relationships.  After Joe’s death reports of other children surfaced in Jet magazine as other women tried to claim a share of the estate.

 

Joseph Arrington 3rd performs as Joe Tex II. He has released two CD’s featuring his own songs and choice items from his father’s catalogue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The southern soul style pioneered by Joe was hardly in fashion in 1982. There was no massive upsurge in record sales or public acclaim triggered by his early death. Joe’s reputation has been on a slow burn since; not forgotten but hardly in the league that his quarter century body of work deserves.

Joe has been nominated for the Rock’n’roll Hall of Fame four times, surely one of the most innovative and distinctive artists not yet to have made it in. Perhaps the fact that some of his songs are not judged politically correct  has held him back. Hopefully one day he will join Solomon Burke, Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett and others in the Cleveland Museum.

 

The Joe Tex songbook has been in steady demand in every decade since the early 1960’s. Since his death artists such as Carly Simon, Huey Lewis & the News, Elvis Costello, Salt ‘n’ Pepa, Hank Williams Jr and Etta James have put their stamp on Joe’s material. Tex songs live on in the repertoire of many R&B revival bands and southern soul singers.

 

 

Carly Simon updated Joe's relationship advice in her version of Hold what you've got.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joe’s rapping style is recognised as a forerunner of hip hop. His voice has echoed through the years as a sample in countless hip hop tracks. The explosive vocals of I gotcha and the rock solid beat of Papa was too have provided the basis of many a rap track. Joe can also be heard on the big screen and has featured in the soundtrack of many films. Quentin Tarantino seems have a particular fondness for his tunes which appeared in Reservoir Dogs and Grindhouse. The 2012 Channing Tatum flick Magic Mike includes Joe's grinding Sassy sexy wiggle.

 

 

 

In 2009 the Black Ensemble Theater in Chicago produced “I Gotcha” (The Story of Joe Tex and the Soul Clan). The play examined the tension between Joe’s need to perform and his Muslim faith, while rocking the house with classic soul tunes. Joe was played by actor Lyle Miller. Ben E King, Solomon Burke and Wilson Pickett were also portrayed in the well reviewed show.

 

 

 

Numerous CD’s have been compiled from Joe's music which is more available than ever in the digital age. Almost every day a Tex tune is uploaded by fans onto YouTube and his tracks appear on downloading and streaming sites in job lots. In the 30th anniversary of his death there is no better time for listeners to go beyond the handful of big pop hits and discover the full warmth, richness and humanity of Joe Tex.

 

 

 

 

 

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